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Eurofurence Community => General Discussion => Topic started by: Schakaline on 29.01.2011, 10:35:48

Title: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: Schakaline on 29.01.2011, 10:35:48
Hello, everybody!

Because the board's currently in hibernation, let's spice up things a bit with a list of pitfalls and other fun things going wrong that happened to people and (unless you read this thread, of course) may be happening to YOU, too.

Yes, it's time for
Eurofurence Essentials

(or: Things You Should've Found Out By Yourself, But Were Too Lazy To.)

In this thread, I will ramble endlessly about things that may seem ever so obvious to a large part of our attendance, but may quirk a brow with people from strange countries. This isn't going to be an one-sided lecture though, so feel free to chime in if you've got fun facts that you learned the hard way.

Today's Lesson is about money.

Unless you've been living under a rock for the past decade or so, it should be known as a fact that Germany uses the euro. That makes life for anyone from the Eurozone much easier in the first place, however, this advantage comes with a few strings attached.


Now that we've got the basics dealt with, some insider location tips:

The area around the Maritim Hotel is plastered with cash machines. However, just don't use the nearest one - sometimes, a simple walk around the street saves you a lot of money. For example, if I used the Santander machine next to the hotel, I'd be charged 5 EUR for it - but if I use the Sparda machine in the mall, it's completely free.

Kaufland doesn't take credit cards. Some people learned that the hard way. :) They DO take Maestro/Girocard, however.

I'll add further posts about other topics over the next few days. Feel free to chime in if you have stuff to share.
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: SouthPaw on 30.01.2011, 19:00:41
Kaufland doesn't take credit cards. Some people learned that the hard way. :) They DO take Maestro/Girocard, however.
They also have an ATM located right by the entrance.

On a related note: You'll need a €1 coin to get a trolley at Kaufland, just like you need £1 coins to get them at UK supermarkets, so keep one handy.

Cheers,

Southie
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: Schakaline on 31.01.2011, 00:50:21
Today's a rather boring Sunday, so here we go with instalment no. 2 of this little series.

Get your copybooks out, as this lesson will be about:
Essential Documents

Some travel documents speak for themselves, like your passport or drivers licence. However, there are a few you might noth have thought of - this is the minimum you should carry.

And a word of personal advice, leave the unimportant stuff at home. Empty out your wallet before you travel, and leave behind the things you're unlikely to use while away. Having to go through a full-scale replacement of every card and pass you carry in your wallet isn't something you want to go through. I got pickpocketed on the Budapest metro back in 2005, and I was -very- fortunate to have my important documents in a concealed bag under my clothing, so all I lost was a bit of loose change and about 50 euros, but didn't ruin my holiday at least.

Now that you've got your money and passport ready, stay tuned - next time we're going to start packing bags!
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: Thoxik on 06.03.2011, 17:21:37
Being only 18 and not having travelled alone a lot.. This is veeery usefull :0
Thanks ;D
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: Schakaline on 17.04.2011, 19:18:02
Here we go again; time's passed and EF's rearing its ugly head again - oh noes!

So, let's head over to chapter 3 quickly:

Packing Your Bags

Easily the most underestimated bit of the whole preparation, many try to postpone this to the very last minute. However, if you consider a few things way ahead of time, you're going to save yourself a lot of hassle.

This post cannot possibly be exhaustive. For further tips and some convention insight, I highly recommend What to take to a convention (http://www.tigerden.com/infopage/furry/con-tips.txt) - the list may be a few decades old and slightly outdated in places, but it still holds many truths.

In the next instalment, now that we're all set up and ready to go, we'll talk about... pitfalls!
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: Sera on 22.08.2011, 13:23:44
Oh yes, I got hit a fair few times by the lack of cards being accepted in various stores. There is a very popular steak house, which is about a 5 minute walk from the hotel, that does NOT take card payments. Thankfully my friend Kacey had plenty for borrow till we got out.

There is a bank inbetween the steak house and the hotel that has cash points, so if you are planning on going to eat there, make sure you get the money from there. I THINK it was a free withdrawl, but I care little for charges. Be sure to check before you do withdraw any.
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: Schakaline on 03.07.2012, 00:50:05
Oh yes. Fashion criminal... err, I mean, Americans!  ;D

To the benefit of the European fashion sense, please consider.

(http://i.imgur.com/3wZOy.jpg)

Go for these instead:
(http://i.imgur.com/aZ3wy.jpg)
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: Santa fox on 03.07.2012, 01:08:11
If I may ask, just wanted to double check on this so I don't go through getting a pass unless it's needed; Will ID cards issued in and for Swedish citizens be valid as ID in Germany? Or do I need to have a passport on hand?
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: o'wolf on 03.07.2012, 01:14:57
If I may, just wanted to double check on this so I don't go through getting a pass unless it's needed; Will ID cards issued in and for Swedish citizens be valid as ID in Germany? Or do I need to have a passport on hand?

We require governmental issued picture IDs that state the age of the owner. Which means, all European ID cards, including Swedish ones, are sufficient. Brits and residents of other nations of paranoid citizens that are refusing to issue ID cards (SCNR) are required to show their passport, though. They have to carry it to get past border control anyway. ;)
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: Blaster-Hedgie on 03.07.2012, 21:51:35
We require governmental issued picture IDs that state the age of the owner. Which means, all European ID cards, including Swedish ones, are sufficient. Brits and residents of other nations of paranoid citizens that are refusing to issue ID cards (SCNR) are required to show their passport, though. They have to carry it to get past border control anyway. ;)

What about a UK Driver's Licence? It shows photo, date of birth and country of origin. Is that accepted in Germany?
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: Nightfox on 03.07.2012, 22:16:53
@ Blaster-Hedgie

As o'wolf said you need a passport to cross the border.
So please bring that for identification, we do not accept a drivers licence
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: Oddity on 04.07.2012, 00:03:55
If I may ask, just wanted to double check on this so I don't go through getting a pass unless it's needed; Will ID cards issued in and for Swedish citizens be valid as ID in Germany? Or do I need to have a passport on hand?

There are two kinds of Swedish ID cards, there's the one you get at the bank/post office/whatever. This one is probably good enough for EF but it's not good enough for Schengen travel, so you'd still "need" to bring a passport...

...or you can get the other kind of Swedish National Identity Card, which is issued by the Police (at the same office where they issue passports). This type is good for travelling inside Schengen and should be good enough for EF as well. It also costs half as much as a passport.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swedish_national_identity_card
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: Santa fox on 04.07.2012, 00:57:49

There are two kinds of Swedish ID cards, there's the one you get at the bank/post office/whatever. This one is probably good enough for EF but it's not good enough for Schengen travel, so you'd still "need" to bring a passport...

...or you can get the other kind of Swedish National Identity Card, which is issued by the Police (at the same office where they issue passports). This type is good for travelling inside Schengen and should be good enough for EF as well. It also costs half as much as a passport.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swedish_national_identity_card


Yeah, I did some poking about myself, and as I will most likely be staying a few days extra in Germany after the con is over at places which might not accept that type of ID, I guess I will have to drag my tail over to the police to get one issued anyhow, better safe than sorry I guess.
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: Ziggy_wolf on 05.08.2012, 22:37:59
You wouldn`t get me in to those clothes at the top there if you thretened to shoot me. The ones at the botom are ok I guess, here`s a fine example of apropriate atire.
(http://www.statoil.com/no/About/ArtProgramme/Perspectives/PublishingImages/Dimmu-Borgir_468.jpg)

A good tip is to buy a (http://www.theartfulcrafter.com/images/Travel%20Pouch%20Front.jpg)
Put all your important tings like money and papers in it and keep it under yopur shirt when you`re out.

I found that a drivers licence it gennerally accepted as an ID, in some places a Visa, like in the rest of Europe. If in doubt bring a passport.

Also you should learn some basic words in german since a lot of older people don`t speak english:
Here are some common words.

Beer:         Bier
Toilet:       Toilette
Vomit:       erbrechen
Thank you: danke


Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: Amy Ninetails on 06.08.2012, 03:51:14
and for all you swedes... it would be a good idea to order your European Health Insurance Card NOW!
http://www.forsakringskassan.se/privatpers/utomlands/eukort

yes, they are free :3
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: Gero on 26.08.2012, 14:14:40
If I may ask, just wanted to double check on this so I don't go through getting a pass unless it's needed; Will ID cards issued in and for Swedish citizens be valid as ID in Germany? Or do I need to have a passport on hand?

I have used my drivers licence in US so Id guess it would be wallid as youre everyday id. BUT: Youll need a passport if youre travelling by air and maybe when youre checking in at the hotel, so its always best to bring it, just to be sure!

As for money; I skip larger sums and focus on 5, 10, and 20 euro bills with an od 50 for the really large sums, but more often than not youre tends to use youre credit card as the payement for larger sums. A good credit card (such as visa, Mastercard) is really helpfull theesedays!

Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: KyuubiSaoirse on 15.01.2014, 10:48:37
OKay, I know it's been an awfully long while since anybody posted here, but... With the ID card thing.

Will a student's card do it in bars aso.? I'll still bring my passport, even though we have that agreement thing so that Danes can travel more freely to German and back again. But I'd rather leave it, and my health insurance card at the hotel.

Though I'd rather bring my health insurance card, in case the student ID card thingie isn't enough. So, to sum it up; is the student card enough for 'normal' ID(it's the only ID with a picture besides my passport), or should I bring the health insurance card along as well? Both state my date of birth. (and therefore shows that I am, in fact, at that time, 22 years old.)
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: Cheetah on 15.01.2014, 11:07:14
Will a student's card do it in bars aso?

It may, or it may not. There is no legislation that forces you to present a specific document, but if it's a card the person who wants to check your age has never seen before in his life, it's unlikely they will accept it. If I had to guess how many people living in berlin are familiar with danish student IDs, I'd say the number is probably low.
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: ysegrim on 15.01.2014, 19:07:48
Is this the international student card (ISIC)? Then my guess is, given Berlin's three universities, that your student ID will accepted (esp. as the legal age for hard alcoholic drinks in Germany is 18, and 16 for beer/wine, so if you vaguely look like 22, it's even possible that they won't ask at all). But your mileage might vary.

(As Cheetah says, while you are not required by law to show a particular ID card at a bar, if a bar lets in a minor after 22h, or if they sell them alcohol, it gets really, really expensive for them -- so they will want to be really sure that you are, in fact, adult. Same for cinemas. And, by the way, for EF, which is why we also check ID cards / passports at the reg desk.)
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: ANTIcarrot on 15.01.2014, 23:19:24
If you've got devices that won't take USB voltage, little pro tip from my side - take a world adapter and a multi-socket outlet from your country with you when you travel.
Correction, take a multi socket and TWO universal adapters. One to turn german sockets to your local standards, and one to convert them back again. Given how furrs tend to clump, there may not be an unoccupied mains socket where you want to plug in, and most people will not be happy about you unplugging them. However most will be willing to share, if there is a plug on your multi-socket that they can use.
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: Cheetah on 16.01.2014, 00:54:04
Easiest way .... get a german-standard power strip from the supermarket. It'll be around 2€ or so, and plug your own adapter into that one. It will prevent you from burning down the house by beginning to chain crazy safety-standard-defying adapter plugs behind each other :)
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: KyuubiSaoirse on 17.01.2014, 13:47:40
[[had pictures of the cards here, now reoved it though I'd censored the crucial bit. Since it seems I do need to carry my passport :/ ]]

I've also got the blue, European health insurance card, if that might help me. I just really want to avoid carrying my passport around if I can, especially since it's so expensive :/ The other cards are easy to get a hold of again if they should be lost, and doesn't really cost that much, so...

Plus, the passport's just so bulky in comparison.
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: Raider on 17.01.2014, 15:16:43
There is a large amount of visible personal data on there... are you sure about uploading this is a good idea?
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: KyuubiSaoirse on 17.01.2014, 19:10:02
I censored the most important bits... At least, I censored what the Danish authorities tell us to sensor before we upload stuff. My student card can't be used to much besides showing, and the other's only really got my address and birth date, after I censored the important bit.
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: KyuubiSaoirse on 17.01.2014, 19:11:00
Besides, I can always remove it once I know what I'll need to have on me at all times... I just wanted to know if these were enough. Or if I should have my passport with me as well, which I'd like to avoid as much as possible.
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: DarkFoxDK on 17.01.2014, 20:26:50
Make it easy on yourself, bring your passport.
Title: Re: Eurofurence Essentials
Post by: KyuubiSaoirse on 17.01.2014, 20:44:20
Make it easy on yourself, bring your passport.

Yeah, I guess I gotta. I'm going to have it with me in germany anyway, I just wanted to avoid carrying it around too much if it was at all possible. Since I don't really have pockets big enough for it.