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Author Topic: The Awful German Language  (Read 35483 times)

Zefiro

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Re: The Awful German Language
« Reply #30 on: 21.09.2007, 12:15:34 »

I assume you also didn't think we wish every female noun to be dead :)
Do you refer to the Meistersinger that everyone wants to kill?
No, I'm referring not to any person but to our definite article for female nouns, which is "Die" :)
Usage example: Die Küchenschabe.

*purrr*
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CodeCat

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Re: The Awful German Language
« Reply #31 on: 21.09.2007, 13:06:53 »

Well nobody's stopping you from using der for them. We Dutch have been doing that for centuries! ;)
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TheSonicGod

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Re: The Awful German Language
« Reply #32 on: 23.09.2007, 06:11:43 »

Why is it that when you send a gift in English, you are trying to make someone happy...

...but when you send a gift in German you are trying to make someone dead?

When I, an Anglophone, say to Nightfox, a DeutschGrammophone, "Nightfox, I have sent you a gift," should he be excited or frightened?


It is one of those "unfriendly" words that got mixed up in translations. I believe that a present (to give someone a gift) is "Geschenk." Correct me if I am wrong.

Similar to how "Who" and "Where" got mixed up in translation:

Who = Wer
Where = Wo
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Okami

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Re: The Awful German Language
« Reply #33 on: 08.10.2007, 00:38:48 »

In case you missed my sketch on Stage Fever: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RQ2hWeI_u60

I fucking love the english language.
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TheSonicGod

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Re: The Awful German Language
« Reply #34 on: 08.10.2007, 05:21:44 »

Bleah... English is like... gumbo soup. You mix just about everything that you think tastes good and you just get something that's mediocre.

German is like a show of fireworks. Beautiful and powerful. Sounds cool, too! ^^
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K9Primate

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Re: The Awful German Language
« Reply #35 on: 08.10.2007, 19:42:47 »

Well you know what they say; the grass always looks greener on the neighbor's lawn.
Both languages have their peculiarities methinks.
Personally I prefer English, but German is a cool language nonetheless. ;)

Something in between Dutch and English: ;D

Rot Young

A terrible infant, called Peter
sprinkled his bed with a gheter.
His father got woost
took hold of a cnoost
and gave him a pack on his meter.
« Last Edit: 08.10.2007, 19:59:52 by K9Primate »
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CodeCat

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Re: The Awful German Language
« Reply #36 on: 08.10.2007, 20:28:56 »

Ah yes, John O' Mill...  ;D
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TheSonicGod

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Re: The Awful German Language
« Reply #37 on: 09.10.2007, 06:11:13 »

Dutch and German have common ground in the Afrikaans language, I believe...

English may be Germanic, but in English's history, it's even related to Danish and Icelandic.
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o'wolf

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Re: The Awful German Language
« Reply #38 on: 09.10.2007, 08:16:49 »

Dutch and German have common ground in the Afrikaans language, I believe...

Only Dutch. Before anyone gets hurt: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afrikaans

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CodeCat

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Re: The Awful German Language
« Reply #39 on: 09.10.2007, 13:13:53 »

English may be Germanic, but in English's history, it's even related to Danish and Icelandic.
And those are Germanic too, so it still fits. :P
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Nightfox

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Re: The Awful German Language
« Reply #40 on: 09.10.2007, 17:01:18 »

Now i know why people frome the us sometimes ask if germany is near brasil   ;D
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K9Primate

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Re: The Awful German Language
« Reply #41 on: 09.10.2007, 20:41:21 »

Apparently it's not quite clear where these languages originate from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/West_Germanic_languages
But it looks like they're all somewhat related. :)
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TheSonicGod

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Re: The Awful German Language
« Reply #42 on: 10.10.2007, 00:03:38 »

Well, something simple. The Scandinavian word for "I" is "Jeg," or "Jag," which curiously sounds very similar. (The G is silent, a trait of Scandinavian and the English languages.)

In Old English, the word for "I" is "Ic." (pronounced "itch".) "Ich," the German word for I, sounds similar, and is also orthographically similar.

The word for "You" in German, in its informal form, is "du," however, is much closer to the word "thou" in certain cases. "Thou" is obsolete in today's modern English.
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