The Eurofurence Forum

Off Topic => General Furry Talk => Topic started by: Xzadfor on 21.04.2016, 04:25:53

Title: First time in Europe
Post by: Xzadfor on 21.04.2016, 04:25:53
I'm kind of nervous sleeping so far from my orbital home. Space foxes use felines as guards and butlers, occasionally they are employed to paint things when they are not otherwise wealthy and need a job. I wonder, would it be possible to send a cheetah, possibly the con chair, to tuck me in at night? Completely innocent request. It would be great if he could read me a story or something too.

-Xzadfor
Title: Re: First time in Europe
Post by: o'wolf on 21.04.2016, 11:01:42
There is no sleep at Eurofurence.  8)

However, if you drink too much beer the tiger that is our head of security will bring you to bed and read you the rules of conduct.
Title: Re: First time in Europe
Post by: Xzadfor on 22.04.2016, 21:58:21
I'm not the beer filled fox you want, I'm the beer filled fox you need.
Title: Re: First time in Europe
Post by: gummi_bjorn on 22.04.2016, 22:03:46
ohhh i thought you were the fox needing to be filled with beer!!
thats what BBF implied. :D
Title: Re: First time in Europe
Post by: Schakaline on 22.04.2016, 22:39:37
I'm not the beer filled fox you want, I'm the beer filled fox you need.

I'm afraid your American beer is a little bit like making love in a canoe. You'll better start a rigorous training regime if you want to compete.
Title: Re: First time in Europe
Post by: gummi_bjorn on 22.04.2016, 22:57:02
the poor fox is in for a rude awakening after the first night of european beer. ;)
Title: Re: First time in Europe
Post by: FireDawgAT on 22.04.2016, 23:01:10
An then there is the moment right after the awakening in the morning - when your body softly whispers in your ear: "Don´t do that again"....    8)
Title: Re: First time in Europe
Post by: gummi_bjorn on 22.04.2016, 23:04:07
after i get a hold of him at the bar, his body wont be whispering anything.
it will be crying for mercy. :D
Title: Re: First time in Europe
Post by: Shinji170981 on 23.04.2016, 08:07:20
One advice for our American fox. Don't mix german beer with other german beers. You will regret that for sure. :)
Your American beer can taste good but due to the different levels of fermentation, the german/European beers are far stronger. If you have the option nearby your place, try to drink german beer and start with something very common like paulaner Weißbier or becks. Those 2 brands are very popular in the US, so you should be able to get them. 10 bottles each and if you are still standing, you are kind of ready for Europe. :)
Title: Re: First time in Europe
Post by: SiranaJHelena on 23.04.2016, 14:22:14
Jep, be careful with the drinks over here. And while we're talking about drugs.. If you overdid a bit and need some painkiller (or other medicine) in the morning after the party, really just take one pill.
Title: Re: First time in Europe
Post by: VulpesRex on 23.04.2016, 20:23:51
Greetings, Xzadfor!

   All levity aside - you entitled this topic as "First time in Europe".  Are there any questions you have concerning a first-time visit to Europe, or to Germany?

   Our hosts - either the germans or the other europeans on this board - are of course the "go to" experts, and have always been most helpful when I have sought answers; but as a fellow-american, I can say that the culture and resources are just different enough - in subtle little ways which we each so take for granted, that it wouldn't occur to us that they might be different on opposite sides of the Atlantic (the beer being just one case in point) - that we might not think to ask our hosts about.

   Things like:

      1)  Money (why you will want a new wallet)

      2)  "Eis Kalt" ("whatta you mean, 'I want ice'!" *frown*)

      3)  Bath linens

      4)  The S-Bahn and U-Bahn are your friends

      5)  Get me to the Bahnhof on time

      6)  What a sandwich is (and is not)

      7)  There may be a deposit on the beer glass

      8)  Power Adaptor Plugs

      9)  The virtue (and value) of "Welcome" or "Visitor" cards for touristy-stuff

      10)  Does that room price include breakfast?

      11)  Travelling Lightly (and the Art and Necessity of Laundry)

      12)  Senf is for your wurst; use Mayo for the Bretzel un Frittes

      13)  There's No Such Thing as "Trash" (almost everything is recyclable or reclaimable)

      14)  Bring your own grocery bag

      15)  The best windows in the world

      16)  Fizzy Water (in moderation) is good for you

   While you will probability survive first-time encounters without needing to know this stuff in advance, it will both speed your travels and enhance the pleasure of the experience if you did ask.

Title: Re: First time in Europe
Post by: Jorinda on 25.04.2016, 10:50:43
use Mayo for the Bretzel
Only if you like the feeling of everyone staring at you in disgust. Brezel belongs with butter (and maybe salt), and nothing else.
Title: Re: First time in Europe
Post by: SiranaJHelena on 25.04.2016, 11:11:48
use Mayo for the Bretzel
Only if you like the feeling of everyone staring at you in disgust. Brezel belongs with butter (and maybe salt), and nothing else.
You can also eat them without any sort of "dip". And be careful with the salt; many Brezels are already salted.

Btw, when you order some fries or sausages, you usually get the chance to choose between mayo and ketcup.
Title: Re: First time in Europe
Post by: VulpesRex on 09.05.2016, 08:29:51
use Mayo for the Bretzel
Only if you like the feeling of everyone staring at you in disgust. Brezel belongs with butter (and maybe salt), and nothing else.

Really!?

   In that case - it seems that I have been the victim of a prank.

   Most americans are familiar with "pretzels" as salted, hard-baked breadstick snacks; in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, they are sold as "soft pretzels", and I have seen them sold at a kiosk in the airport in Pittsburgh...accompanied with Mustard ("senf").  On my first visit to Germany, I had bought some real brezels to eat on the train to Suhl, and when I asked for some mustard, was met with just such a look of shock by the shopkeeper.  A fellow-traveller advisd me that mustard was a definite no-no, but that mayonaisse was a good condiment, which seemed to make sense as I usually have sandwiches made with mustard and mayo.

   We americans are impulsive "dippers" and "dunkers"; we do it with most "finger foods".  For example, It's common to dunk doghnuts into our coffee (or milk), particularly if they are less than fresh.  Common Diner slang for a doughnut is a "Sinker", and it is the source for the name of the "Dunkin' Donuts" franchise.

******
   In our third year in Magdeburg, the entire trip in from my doorstep until I arrived at the Hauptbahnhof had been a "trip through hell", with delays and a side-trip to London and an encounter with a Gypsie (Roma) thrown in; I arrived at 03:00 in the morning, roughly 12 hours late, tired and hungry, and paused for a burger at the McDonald's at the station.  I ordered something called a combo meal of a "Big Texan" (something which isn't served in the USA), which came with some sort of red spicy "TexMex" sauce on the burger.  I requested ice in my softdrink, which required the fraulein at the counter to go in the back and get some ice.  Then while the burger was being cooked, she asked if I wished mayo or kechup, and I THOUGHT she meant for the burger.  That was confusing, as It was supposed to come with the texmex sauce, but if she had to make the sauce fresh, I asked for it to include both.  "Nein!  You may have one or the other!  NOT "both"!  Which is it to be?"  And she said it so forcefully, while holding out packets of each condiment in each hand and with an air of urgency like this were a life-or-death decision, that I was thoroughly intimidated and stammered out that it was OK, I didn't actually require either condiment.  This seemed to annoy her.  "NO, No, you get one without charge, it is part of the order!"  And there were people in line behind me, giving me odd looks.  I insisted that I wouldn't require anything other than what came with the sandwich.  "But one is included!  You must choose!"

   At this point I was ready to flee the restaurant - I was tired and travel-weary and needed a room and a bath and a bed, and my judgement wasn't the best.  Finally she dropped her arms to her sides and with a resigned air said that she would bring out my order when it was ready.

   Only later, when I saw others using the condiment packets on their french fries, and noticed that Ketchup was NOT available by the napkins, did I discover that she was referring to the fries all along; that the condiment portion was carefully rationed, not take-as-you-need, and that the burger did have the TexMex spiced sauce, as specified on the menu board.
Title: Re: First time in Europe
Post by: Shinji170981 on 09.05.2016, 20:07:17
Actually the Bretzel is a very versatile food.
Depending on the region in Germany, the Bretzel is consumed in different ways.
Like for example in the southwest you can get the Bretzel cut in half with Butter and if you like with toppings like meat/salat or the Bretzel is baked with cheese on top.
So there are probably more than 50 ways to eat a Bretzel in Germany alone, so don't worry too much. It's most likely personal/regional preference^^

Just enjoy the bretzel with whatever you like, as long as it tastes good.
I mean there are even people that peel off the salt from the Bretzel.....
Title: Re: First time in Europe
Post by: Drift on 10.05.2016, 15:52:13
Oh yes, German beer is so potent that you have to get three empty glasses extra in order to pour the beer from glas to glas while you drink it, otherwise it will melt through... ;D

And the best way to consum soft brezen is with fresh butter and chopped chives sprinkled on top  :P